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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)
't want to speculate. >> i need to report to you, gabe, that our justice correspondent pete williams is reporting that a law enforcement official says initial reports are that the kidnapper in alabama is dead and the boy is okay. >> reporter: okay. well, that's news to me, martin. again, you know, i've been with you for the past few minutes and we do not know here on the scene that has not been reported to us. but it did seem there was some excitement from law enforcement officials if it is true that the child was found safe. so we'll just have to wait and see over the next few minutes once officials come here and tell us exactly what happened. >> but you did mention earlier that you saw an ambulance moving. is that right? >> reporter: that is correct. that would seem to suggest that the child might have been brought out on that ambulance. we don't know that for sure, but we had not seen that ambulance come down that dirt road before, and it was around the same time we heard that boom, when we heard that activity, and, you know, we're just really waiting to find out, and certainly if
correspondent, pete williams, at the court. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, here's the question about the voting rights act. it puts an extra burden on states with a history of discriminating at the polls. but does it cover the areas of the country where the problem is the worst? tonight, a bare majority of the supreme court seems to think the answer is no, and if that's the case, the law is in big trouble. ♪ >> reporter: dramatizing the high stakes, civil rights veterans passionately defended the law outside the court. >> we are not going back. we have come too far. we made too much progress to go back. >> at stake, the most important civil rights law ever passed, a response to widespread voter discrimination in the south. president johnson signed the voting rights act in 1965 at the u.s. capitol. fast forward, 48 years. >> i barack hussein obama, do solemnly swear. >> reporter: now with the first african-american president re-elected and more minority in congress and state houses, shelby county, alabama, south of birmingham, says the law renewed in 2006 is so outdated, it's no lon
williams in our washington newsroom with more on this story tonight. pete, good evening. >> reporter: brian, the justice department claims lance armstrong was cheating the federal government when he raced in the tour de france on a team sponsored by the u.s. postal service. the government today joined a lawsuit that had been filed earlier by one of his teammates, floyd landis. it says armstrong violated a strict ban on illegal drugs, all the while claiming he never used them. the government says armstrong and his team owners cheated the postal service out of at least $30 million that it paid to sponsor his racing team. but armstrong's lawyers say tonight the postal service's own study show it benefited tremendously from its sponsorship, benefits totalling more than $100 million. the justice department says lance armstrong's confessional television interview will be a factor as this goes forward, brian. >> pete williams in d.c. for us tonight. pete, thanks. >>> now to that huge winter storm that left parts of the midwest buried in snow overnight. it's all headed northeast now with new englan
for more experts with the training to prevent them. nbc's justice correspondent pete williams has more tonight. >> reporter: at the offices of cyber watch dog mandiant security computer consultant for "the washington post" and "new york times" a constant vigil keeps watch for signs of attacks on them and other clients. the company also devises ways to stay a step ahead to block attempted intrusions from succeeding. >> there is always going to be some kind of gap attackers can exploit and very often we see companies haven't invested in responding to the fact that they will sustain a breach and many times they're caught flat footed when it occurs. >> reporter: with cyber attacks on the rise against banks, news organizations, social media, and the systems that keep the country going, there's a growing worry that the u.s. faces a serious shortage of people who know how to respond. >> it takes a thousand hours of hands on work just like a pilot. you can't be a good pilot unless you've actually flown an airplane under pressure. you can't be a good cyber person unless you've actually fought i
. our report on all of it tonight from our justice correspondent pete williams. >> reporter: the justice department and a dozen states today accused the world's largest credit rating agency, standard & poor's, or s&p, of endorsing investments that it knew were shaky, playing a direct role in the housing collapse. >> s&p was a trigger for the destruction of our economy. while big banks and lenders built mortgage-backed bombs, it was s&p's faulty ratings that detonated them. >> reporter: the lawsuits claim that for at least three years s&p gave its highest rating, aaa, to financial packages issued by banks and made up of mortgages, even though the company knew the investments were risky. s&p did it, the government claims, to please the very banks that were paying it to rate their investments. >> we have evidence that s&p not only knew this is what the banks were doing, s&p helped them to do it. >> reporter: the company says its ratings were honest calls, based on assessments of the housing market at the time, similar to what the man who was then treasury secretary was saying. >> the rating
tonight from our justice correspondent, pete williams. >> reporter: it's a staple of police drama. >> cold case in sacramento and new york. ran dna from rape kits ten years ago. >> reporter: four years ago, maryland police took a dna sample from alonzo king when they arrested him on a gun charge, rubbing a cotton swab inside his cheek like this, then submitting his dna profile to a national database. it found a match with dna from an unsolved rape and robbery six years earlier. every state now gathers dna from anyone convicted of serious crimes. half the states do it with people arrested, too, but defense lawyers say that's just phishing with no grounds to think that some other crime was committed. >> in the dna sample, there's a lot of medical information concerning the individual, about the individual's genetic heritage, about the people that they are related to. >> reporter: but the mother of katie sepich, a college student raped and murdered in 2003, says her daughter's killer could have been caught sooner if police had put his dna on file when he was arrested for an earlier c
hot investigation going on to find it, but i will point out pete williams, harrison pete williams, as you recall, wolf, involved in a scandal from the senate, another senator from new jersey. so this could all be just baiting the press to try to get us to investigate these cases. >> might be. all right, drew, hold on for a moment. i want to bring in the woman who first got those williams' e-mails. melanie saloon -- sloan, executive director of the group for responsibility and ethics. you said you and your organization were skeptical, but the more you dug, the more you thought perhaps there was merit to the allegations. explain what happened? >> this tipster, pete williams, first reached out to us back in april. and in his initial e-mail, he didn't mention anything about underaged prostitute, he mentioned prostitutes. shortly thereafter, he mentioned underaged prostitutes, but we were skeptical because he said he had known about these allegations, had evidence since as early as 2008. now we're talking it's the spring of 2012, shortly before senator menendez's re-election when the s
once again back in alabama. nbc justice correspondent, pete williams, is live in front of the supreme court. if you could give us an update, section v may be in danger. >>reporter: part of voting five, the part that says any state covered by the law has to get federal permission before making changes to the law. as long as we are getting technical, section iv which sets out the formula that says which parts of the country are covered by the law. remember the constitutional part of this. it gives it states the decision to run their own elections. what congress said is the states had such a problem, were so discriminatory the federal government should override. the question now is is the problem still serious enough, "a" and does the law cover the areas where the problem is the most serious? now what several members of the court said today, the most liberal, it may not be perfect, but it's a pretty good fit if you look at where the problems persist. try to attack the voting changes. it's a pretty good fit with the coverage areas now. the conservatives on the court say yes, but the probl
, including some very big names. our report from nbc's pete williams. >> reporter: the "new york times" says hackers have been attacking its computer system for the past four months. even managing to get passwords for individual reporters. the paper says its own security experts and the fbi traced the intrusions to hackers in china who it says were employing techniques associated in the past with hackers from the chinese military. another newspaper, "the wall street journal" says it too was hit by chinese hackers who apparently wanted to monitor its china reporting. no attempt, the journal says, to steal customer data. in beijing, any suggestion that the chinese were involved, quote, irresponsible. but "the times" says the hack attack coincided with a series of stories it posted on its website, which reported that relatives of china's prime minister had amassed a fortune worth several billion dollars through business deals. >> we first noticed the unusual activity on our network shortly after we published our article about the outgoing chinese ruling family. >> reporter: security experts and
sides are hoping that time is on their side. pete williams, nbc news, washington. >>> and we turn now to weather in the news. a lot of folks on the east coast, especially in new england, are all riled up for the potential arrival of a big snow-making weather system. weather channel meteorologist jim cantore is with us tonight. jim, what's on the way? >> yeah, hey, brian. this on the 35th anniversary of the famous blizzard of '78 which pretty much shut down boston. right now boston under a blizzard watch. i expect others to follow. portland, southern new hampshire, even parts of connecticut i think as confidence grows in the forecast. in play thursday, chicago and atlanta. we will have issues there, obviously, at the airports. by 5:30 friday morning, this model says, hey, it will be snowing to new york. but we expect a changeover. the big question is, how much of a changeover. that makes new york's forecast very, very tricky. by friday night, into saturday morning, blizzard conditions throughout new england. a crippling snowstorm and the impact here. confidence for at least 2 feet ther
. both of them now face possible prison time. our report from our justice correspondent, pete williams. >> reporter: for jesse jackson jr., the walk into the courthouse was the end of a slow-motion fall from grace. he told a federal judge, for years i have lived off my campaign. admitting that he took money received in political contributions and used it to make more than 3,000 separate purchases for himself and his wife over the past seven years. a $43,000 gold watch. $19,000 for one of michael jackson's guitars. $16,000 for a pair of elk heads. tens of thousands more in furnishings for their homes in washington and chicago. total value, $750,000. >> jesse jackson jr. had the drive, the ability and the talent to be the voice of a new generation. but he squandered that talent. >> reporter: as he left today, jackson was apologetic. >> not a proud day. i'm sorry i let everybody down. >> reporter: but his lawyer says at age 47, he still has a promising future. >> a man that talented, a man that devoted to public service, a man who has done so much for so many, has another day. there will
the "new york times" which disclosed that the computers were i will filtrated. pete williams reports. >> reporter: "the new york times" says hackers have been attacking its computer system for the past four months, even managing to get pass words for individual reporters. the paper says the own security experts and the fbi traced the intrusions to hackers in china who it says were employing techniques associated in the past with hackers from the chinese military. another newspaper, "the wall street journal" says it, too, was hit by chinese hackers who wanted to monitor the china reporting. no attempt, the journal says, to steal customer data. in beijing, a spokesman for china's foreign ministry called any suggestion that the chinese were involved "irresponsible" but the times says the attack coincided with a series of stories it posted on the website which reported that relatives of china's prime minister had he massed a fortune worth several billion dollars through business deals. >> we first noticed the unusual activity on our network shortly after we published our article about th
three months. an explanation tonight from nbc's pete williams. >> we all need to repent -- >> reporter: outside boy scout headquarters in dallas, scouting parents brought their children, opposing any change and relieved by the delay. >> the membership is very against this. and instead you've got a little group that doesn't really represent us trying to make a decision that's going to affect all of us. >> reporter: scouting's board of directors today put off until may a scheduled vote on a plan to end the national ban on gay scouts and gay scout leaders and let individual scout troops decide the issue for themselves. in a written statement, the boy scouts said because of an outpouring of feedback and complexity of this issue, the organization needs time for a more deliberate review of its membership policy. scouting insiders say the board did not have the votes to pass it today. with a raging debate inside the boy scout community, both sides demand a greater voice. today's postponement comes as a new quinnipiac university poll shows 55% of national respondents support a change. 33% oppo
face prison time, perhaps as much as four years. pete williams, nbc news, at federal court in washington. >>> things got hot in arizona yesterday during a constituent town hall meeting with senator john mccain. it got tense when he got an earful on a couple of issues. after a while, the senator pushed back. and it started on immigration. >> and you're a senator with the federal government, and you're doing nothing about it. you said build the dang fence. where's the fence? >> in case you missed it, i showed you. >> that's not a fence. >> that's not a fence? it's a banana. we are putting up a banana with about $600 million worth of appropriations we have. sir, you can -- you're entitled to your opinion. you're not entitled to your facts. the facts are that we have made significant improvements on the border. >> everybody in this audience right here. >> you know -- >> you're taking away from their social security to give it to a dependent class of people. >> taking away from their social security? this is an overwhelming experience. i've had enough, sir. you've had enough. >>
. >> let's turn now to pete williams who joins us live from the supreme court. pete is our justice correspondent. as i understand it, this is an opportunity for the supreme court to consider whether racial discrimination at the voting booth is still a serious challenge for voters and whether the voting rights act is still necessary. you've been following the day's proceedings. what's your impression of how members of the court see the issue? >> my impression, martin, is that at least five members of the court have doubts about the constitutionality of this law. what they're concerned about is not the idea of the preclearance requirement. it's the practice of where it's applied. the question here is is the area covered by the law a close enough fit to where the problem is? now, the court's more liberal members say it is close enough. if you look, for example, at the states covered by the law in the south, even though they account for only 25% of the nation's population, they account for over half of the successful voter discrimination lawsuits. suggesting it's working where the prob
justices overturned the 1965 law. nbcs justice correspondent pete williams joins me now from the supreme court. pete, from the arguments today, what is your impression of what way the court might be moving? >> well, you know, the court didn't come with a blank slate. four years ago, the court looked at the same question and laid down a marker. we were watching to see if the justices that were skeptical then changed their mind? the answer is no. five votes to strike down a key part of the voting rights act. it's a law that requires states with a history of discrimination to get permission before they make changes in how they change their elections. strike down a companion part of which states are covered by the law. they think it's out of date. chief roberts asked which state has the worst record in registering and turnouts of african-americans? answer he said, massachusetts, mississippi is best. at another point he said to the solicitor general, do you think people in the south are more racist than people in the north? it's questions like that that made it clear that chief justice robert
to put that together. >> now both sides are hoping that time is on their side. pete williams, nbc news, washington. >>> and we turn now to weather in the news. a lot of folks on the east coast, especially in new england, are all riled up for the potential arrival of a big snow-making weather system. weather channel meteorologist jim cantore is with us tonight. jim, what's on the way? >> yeah, hey, brian. this on the 35th anniversary of the famous blizzard of '78 which pretty much shut down boston. boston under a blizzard watch. i expect others to follow. portland, southern new hampshire, even parts of connecticut i think as confidence grows in the forecast. in play thursday, chicago and atlanta. we will have issues there, obviously, at the airports. by 5:30 friday morning, this model says, hey, it will be snowing to new york. but we expect a changeover. the big question is, how much of a changeover. that makes new york's forecast very, very tricky. by friday night, into saturday morning, blizzard conditions throughout new england. a crippling snowstorm and the impact here. confidence f
it needs more time to e review this policy. pete williams joins us live. why the delay? >> the scouts say a couple things about this. first of all, they have had an outpouring of feedback that shows how deeply care about scouting and about this it issue. it's complex and need more time for what they call a deliberate review of the membership policy. there was to be a vote today before the 33-member board. by postponing it to may, they will have it before the national council. so both sides of this hope the time will work in their favor. people who think the change should happen, and remember the change under discussion, the scouts would remove the national ban from their membership rules and leave it up to local units to admit gay scouts and gay scout leaders. the advocates of the change think time is good for them, but opponents think time is on their side. we're told that there's a civil war within the scouting organization and they need time to sort it out. >> it it this because so many churches and scouts are sponsored by churches? was it a pushback from the religious community? >> we
delicious! >>> breaking news concerning the disgraced olympian lance armstrong, and our pete williams is joining us from d.c. to explain how a case from the government is moving forward. pete. >> this is a serious new legal threat to lance armstrong who has so far successfully avoided any legal reprecussions from his use of performance enhancing drugs in the tour de france. the justice department will shortly moif a federal court here in washington that it is joining a whistle blower lawsuit that was filed two years ago by one of armstrong's former teammates, floyd landis. now, landis has admitted cheating in the tour de france, but in a 33-page lawsuit that he filed two years ago he claims that lance armstrong twice gave him hormones that were banned and that he twice participated with armstrong in a practice called blood doping, where you take some of your own blood out, put it in the refrigerator, and then put it back in right before a race, and the government's involvement here will basically claim that lance armstrong defrauded the federal government because his tour de france te
on civil rights activists. many are ramping up their messaging ahead of wednesday's case. pete williams joins me now with more on this. pete, what fueled the case that's under debate here? let's talk specifically about how it is raised to the level it is now. >> it is an appeal from shelby county, alabama, one of the areas covered. basically that this law has time passed us by. when congress renewed it in 2006, renewed four times, they didn't marshal enough evidence to show that it is still constitutional because it turns everything upside down. anything the states do to change their election rules is presumed to be improper until they get federal permission and say that violates state sovereignty. the question is the voting rights act still current enough to pass the constitutional test. what many of the states say, including shelby county is, there are parts of the south where a -- blacks register, rote and elect people in greater numbers than in many parts of the mortds that are not cover bid the voting rights act and say it is unfair. thomas, four years ago the supreme court came cl
williams, our justice correspondent, joins me. what do you know, pete? >> well, chris, there will be no decision today. it had been expected that the boy scouts' board of directors' meeting in texas today would vote on this issue. that's what the scouts had said last week. but now they've put this off until at least may. and it's also going to be decided not simply by the boy scouts' board, but by the larger 1,400 voting members of the boy scouts' national council. so that could change very significantly what happens here. the boy scouts say that the controversy since this came to light a week ago has produced what i'm reading now from a statement they just put out. an outpouring of feedback from the american republic, showing how deeply people care about scouting, and then they say due to the complexity of this issue, the organization needs time for a more deliberate review of its membership poll circumstance and therefore in order to further engage representatives of scouting's membership and listen to their concerns, this will be put off until the national council m
members. with me to talk more about this, pete williams. and here in new york with me, zack walls. he's also the author of the book "my two moms: lessons of love, strength, and what makes a family." great to have you here. pete, the bax fasic facts of whe know about how this decision came down, because a lot of people were anticipating how this vote was going to go today, but they've pushed it until later in the spring. >> what the boy scouts' statement says is that they received what they call an outpouring of feedback from the american public and they say due to the complexity of the issue, the organization needs time for a more deliberate review of its policy. so it's not only putting the decision off until may of this year, that's one thing. but the second thing is they say the decision in may will be made not by the board, which the organization meet taking in texas, but by a much larger national council, 1,400 voting members of that. and so the question is whether the national council, which includes more members of the sponsoring churches that are involved in scouting, would co
correspondent pete williams jones me now from the newsroom. how is the justice department getting into this case? what is the affect of that? >> well, legal sources tell, you andrea, that the justice department will sign on and its considerable weight to a lawsuit that's been filed against armstrong by one of its former tour de france teammates, floyd landis. he filed this lawsuit two years ago basically claiming that lance armstrong defrauded the federal government. here's the theory of the case. the claim is that when armstrong agreed to race for the team sponsored by the u.s. postal service, he was in essence defrauding the government because the postal service requires everybody who works for it not to use any illegal drugs, and armstrong, landis claims, was, in fact, blood doping and using hormones chshgs are both forbidden by the fewer defrance and they claim by the postal service itself. it's a civil lawsuit claiming that he cheated the government and, of course, the u.s. postal service paid millions of dollars to sponsor the tour de france teams on which lance armstrong raced and, of cou
to the republican national economy, and pete williams. i have my own theory on this but there are specific questions. >> interestingly mccutcheon's lawyer is the same one that brought the citizens united case to the supreme court. basic question is is it constitutional to have this limit on what you can give every two years. they say, yeah, we understand the anti-corruption reason to have the individual limits but they say there's no such thing at play if you're giving to several -- if you max out on what you can individually give to a whole bunch of candidates. now the government's argument is that's just an end run around the individual contribution limits. then you can give to all sorts of people and have that money funnel back and it is a thing we don't want to have happen. but here's the thing. what mccutcheon says is, i think you should find these limits unconstitutional. i think you should at the very least, if you have a problem, you should go back to the supreme court's decision in 1976, the post-water gate decision that first split this baby and said you can't limit how much a candidate ca
rights act has out lived its legitimacy. nbc justice correspondent pete williams was inside the supreme court and joins me now. explain the arguments that you heard. >> reporter: thomas, the court heard argument for about an hour and 15 minutes. i think it is a safe prediction to say the voting rights act as it now stands is not going to survive. the question is how far will the supreme court go in striking parts of it down? what seemed to concern the majority of the justices was the fact that the law is too backward looking. when it was passed in 1965 it was intended to deal with a clearly documented pattern of racial discrimination in the south trying to prevent blacks from registering, voting, and being able to elect people. and the problem many of the justices say is that now the law when it was re-enacted the last time isn't forward looking enough. many of the justices said the problems in the south aren't as bad as they are in some places in the north and it troubled them that the law doesn't have any way to deal with that. i think two of the key justices that we looked at were ju
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 86 (some duplicates have been removed)